Are single-lenses right for me?

If you only need glasses for one type of vision, your optometrist may prescribe single-vision glasses to you. People under 40 usually have this type of lens as they’re more likely to have just one type of visual requirement.

If you’re over 40, you may need to have separate glasses for separate things, such as one pair for seeing far away, like when you’re driving, and one pair for close-up tasks, like reading.

Your optometrist will be able to recommend the best lens option to suit your needs.

Cost of single-vision lenses

All of our glasses come with single-vision lenses including a scratch-resistant treatment and UV protection as standard, so there’s no extra charge for these lenses. You can also choose from a range of lens extras and treatments that can protect or enhance your glasses.

Frequently asked questions

What is the difference between single-vision and progressive lenses?

Single-vision lenses provide a correction for only one vision type, whereas progressive lenses are lenses that have multiple corrections within the one lens, in different sections. Your optometrist will recommend the right lenses for you.

What is the difference between single-vision and bifocal lenses?

Single-vision lenses have one prescription. Whereas bifocal lenses have a distinct line in the lens where the two prescriptions vary – the upper part is to correct distance vision and the lower part is to correct close vision. Your optometrist will recommend the right lenses for you.

More about lenses

Lens options

All Specsavers glasses come with standard single-vision lenses plus a scratch-resistant treatment and UV protection. You can also get extra lens treatments and options to protect or enhance your glasses.

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Bifocal lenses

If you need separate glasses for distance vision and reading, then bifocal lenses might be an option for you as they’re designed to accommodate two different prescriptions – usually distance and up-close vision.

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Progressive lenses

These lenses accommodate more than two vision types, and unlike the clear distinction on bifocals, they have different sections for viewing close-up, far away and everything in between. 

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